Thirty Seconds of Fury

It’s a shame, but due to the brown drink, over 30 minutes of stories which the phrase “thirty seconds of fury” originated in had to be edited out to protect the guilty.  But there is still plenty of nonsense and listener emails to make it worth your while.

At the start, Gustav is feeling nostalgic for the days of the early eighties when watching music videos out in the country meant having to wait for Friday Night Videos to come on or to catch a syndicated video show hosted by Bo and Jim from Q102, now KZPS.  There was no cable out in the country, so no MTV, unless you were one of the lucky ones with a giant satellite dish out in the yard and some sort of probably illegal decoder on top of your Zenith or Quasar fake wood paneled tv set.

The great Austin finally sent us in an email and he asks who would we cast to play ourselves in the inevitable blockbuster feature film adaptation of the Can You Hear Me podcast. Please email or tweet us who you would like to see portray your favorite educated hillbillies on the silver screen.  Austin also shares with us a wonderfully weird artifact from the sixties called “Communism, Hypnotism, and the Beatles” by David E. Noebel.  We weren’t aware that the three were related.  It sounds more like a Can You Hear Me episode title instead of an actual book.

the beatles, communism, hypnotims, cold war sixties

Communism, Hypnotism and the Beatles by David E. Noebel

Long time good time West Texas Travis sends us an email that disturbs all three members.  Then JJ warms our hearts with a tale of fisticuffs as he stands up to some Houston punks.  We also lay the foundation for our upcoming William F. Buckley Jr. episode so be sure to do your homework and watch “Best of Enemies” on Netflix to learn the background of the Gore Vidal and William F. Buckley debates during the 1968 presidential election.

As always, please email us your stories, questions or observations to canyouhearmepod@gmail.com